Singaporebrides | Fashion

December 2013

A Bride’s Guide to Wedding Veils

Wearing a wedding veil has been an important wedding tradition in the West since the 19th century. Back then, brides wore white wedding veils as a symbol of their virginity and modesty, while the Roman brides before them wore flame-coloured ones as protection against evil spirits on their wedding day. Today, the wearing of wedding veils symbolises a bride’s transition from being a single woman to a married one and is a tradition widely practiced all over the world. Like your wedding gown, there are many different types of wedding veils to suit every occasion and bride. To help you learn about the different wedding veils and find out which one completes your wedding look, SingaporeBrides has put together a short but comprehensive guide on wedding veils.


weddingveils5 Image cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by Albert Palmer

A blusher is the piece of veil shielding the bride’s face as she walks down the aisle. It varies in length, from birdcage to much longer, and can be layered with other lengths of veils to create a layered look.

Birdcage Veil

weddingveils1 Left, Image cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo by Ⅿeagan. Right, Image cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by Ryan G. Smith

Quickly gaining popularity in recent years due to its flexibility and versatility, birdcage veils are the shortest in length and are usually made out of fishnet or tulle. It comes in a variety of lengths, although it is most commonly worn just covering the eyes or extending down to the chin. It complements any hairstyle and length, and is usually decorated with fascinators, flowers or a jeweled brooch.

Shoulder Length Veil

weddingveils6 Image cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by Albert Palmer

A shoulder length veil is one that ends anywhere from your shoulders to the middle of your back. This veil is perfect because it retains the tradition of a wedding veil without being heavy or cumbersome while allowing brides to show off any detailing on their gowns. A variation of the shoulder length veil is the flyaway veil, which usually consists more than one tier.


wedding veil15 Image cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by Krista Guenin

A bouffant is a pouf veil that just grazes the top of the shoulders and adds a ‘60s flair to your wedding ensemble. Made up of layers of tulle pinned together to create a voluminous look, this style of veil is not for the shy bride.

Elbow Length Veil

wedding veils Left, Image, from Sandra Aberg Photography. Right, Image cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by Krista Guenin

Elegant and easy to handle, the elbow length veil is a perfect complement to full-length gowns as it ends just where the skirt of the gown begins, creating a very flattering silhouette. Pair an elbow length veil with a blusher to retain that classic romantic look a full-length veil offers without the hassle of carrying one around. Because it is considered to be an informal veil, the elbow length veil is ideal for daytime weddings.

Fingertip Length Veil

weddingveils8 Left and Right Images cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by Lea Ann Belter

If you were following the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, then you will be familiar with the fingertip length veil. An extremely popular style of veil, the fingertip length veil flatters most brides and gowns.

Ballet Length Veil

wedding veils9 Left, Image cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by Lea Ann Belter. Right, Image cc licensed ( BY NC SA ) flickr photo by Mandy Mayberry

Falling anywhere between the knee and the ankle, the ballet length veil is short enough to waltz and walk around in without worrying about tripping over, and long enough to maintain the tradition and elegance of longer veils.

Chapel Length Veil

weddingveils15 Photo by; Glen Sin Photography

The chapel length veil is incredibly romantic and elegant, and ideal for formal weddings. It goes all the way to the ground and can be combined with a blusher or an elbow length veil for a layered look.

Cathedral Length Veil

weddingveils11 Left and Right Images cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by Lea Ann Belter

Typically worn in church and very formal weddings, cathedral length veils are floor length and wider than the frame of the gown by a few inches or several feet. This style of veil is great for creating a dramatic walk down the aisle.


weddingveils2 Image cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by

Pronounced as ‘man-tea-ya’, a mantilla is a circular piece of lace or tulle rimmed heavily with lace used to frame a bride’s face. It can be combined with a more traditional veil to retain the traditional lengths while maintaining that pretty laced-edge look.

Juliet Cap

weddingveils7 Left, Image and Right, Image cc licensed ( BY NC ) flickr photo by Lianne Nichols

Otherwise known as the lace cap, this veil is fitted around the crown of the head and comes in varying lengths. Worn by Kate Moss and Lily Allen at their weddings, the Juliet Cap was first seen in the 16th century before gaining popularity in the 1920’s and 1970’s.

Tips on Choosing The Right Wedding Veil

weddingveils13 Image cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by Lea Ann Belter

Choosing the right wedding veil for your big day involves as much science as choosing your dream gown. The type of veil you’ll wear on your wedding day depends on the silhouette and length of your gown, so always decide on your wedding gown first before buying one to ensure that your veil complements your overall look. Bring your veil along to your hair and makeup trial so you’ll have a chance to discuss what works and don’t work for your veil and hairstyle. And if you have extra cash on hand to spare, splurge on 2 different veils for different looks at your reception and wedding banquet. Or, simply choose to leave your wedding veil behind for your banquet to achieve 2 different looks without spending extra.


Feature Image: Image cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo by Lea Ann Belter / cropped from original.