Singaporebrides | Fashion

March 2010

Heavenly Delights

Thirteen years ago, when Divine Couture first opened its doors, brides all over Singapore were swathed in voluminous frocks drenched in embellishments.

But designers Kim Tay and Jessica Ong decided to focus on crafting gowns that enhanced the bride’s features and personality instead. It was a brave move that turned out to be brilliant. These days, mention Divine Couture, and one of its exquisite, classic confections immediately pop into mind.

Says Kim, “A bridal gown should be timeless and transcend trends, so a woman does not need to look at her wedding photographs 10 years later in regret, and go, ‘Oh, that’s what was in vogue during the millennium era’.”

Based on this astute design philosophy, the duo have pushed out collection after collection of elegant and enchanting gowns that stay understated while playing up the feminine silhouette. Having the lines clean and simple, adds Kim, helps keep the attention on the bride’s lovely face and joyful expressions.

Take the newest numbers from Divine Couture as examples. One features a cheongsam-inspired upper bodice that ends in a frothy trail, while another offers a subtly but glamorous take on the straight-cut gown with a long tulle train.

“The key about our works is balance,” Kim reveals. “Asian women are quite petite. So it’s important to avoid crowding all the details in one particular area, such as the front. Otherwise, the effect can become too overwhelming, and the bride can end up looking matronly.”

That’s why gowns at Divine Couture are not only effortlessly chic, but also offer sufficient details in all the right places. Backs are sensuously bare or low-cut, while trains are sprinkled, not littered, with pretty ribbons or softened up with ruffles.

Kim advises, “Less is always more. More bling does not necessarily make a gown more beautiful. A longer train does not necessarily heighten the impact. What’s most important is that your gown matches your personality and you can carry it off well.”

This design aesthetic also applies for the duo’s latest range of evening gowns. Based on the slimming silhouette of the cheongsam, these lace-and-satin concoctions dazzle in an array of strong jewel tones such as tamarind and lilac.

Finally, Kim’s other piece of advice for brides is to trust their own judgement: “A wedding is an once-in-a-lifetime event, so the gown should be one that the bride herself knows she wants and appreciates.”